04 November, 2008

Sinking In. The Numbers Help

I've spent most of tonight staring in disbelief at post after post about our victory. It's almost too much to believe. I should have gone downtown and marched in the streets with many other deliriously happy Obama fans, but I didn't know about that little event until long after it was over.

It's okay. I've been looking at some numbers. Some glorious, beautiful numbers.

First off, states:

Obama: 27 + DC
McCain: 20
Too Close to Call: 3

Arizona disappointed me, but Indiana pulled through, and it looks like North Carolina will as well. Watching a lot of Republicon strongholds fall tonight was awe-inspiring. That map's turning bluer as we speak.

The electoral vote is delicious:

Obama: 349
McCain: 147

My darlings, this is what is known as an ass whuppin'. And it ain't over yet.

Are you ready for your eyes to pop? Check out the current popular vote total so far:

Obama: 62,202,520
McCain: 55,207,708

Obama has already won the most votes of any presidential candidate in our history. I believe this is what we like to call a "mandate."

And how about turnout? Not too shabby:

From the Politico ...

More than 130 million people turned out to vote Tuesday, the most ever to vote in a presidential election.

With ballots still being counted in some precincts into Wednesday morning, an estimated 64 percent of the electorate turned out, making 2008 the highest percentage turnout in generations.

We have at least 55 Senate seats, with at least a hope in hell of reaching that magic 60 once the close races are called.

We picked up 17 House seats, with a few more too close to call: right now, we're at 251-171, which I don't have to tell you is a rock-solid majority.

We have our majorities. We have our mandate. Now it's time for us to put them to good use.

Howard Dean's fifty-state strategy paid huge dividends. Let's keep that going. In 2012, I want to be able to drive from sea to shining sea passing through nothing but deep blue states.

Yes. We. Can.


Andre Vienne said...

Yeah. I'm glad that Dean is vindicated now, and his method was proved to work, and so successfully, as well!

Today is a good day. I feel much better now, knowing that my country decided with me.

Unfortunately, now we have to slide from annoying political lies to annoying Christmas music in stores. For the next two months.

I want my terrible politics back. At least those I didn't have to hear while shopping. <.<

george.w said...

Christmas music, I can deal with (I am hard of hearing and don't shop much!) But I am hard-pressed to express the relief that I feel this morning.

I would have scaled a hundred-foot cliff to vote for Barack. Now we are going to get some great Supreme Court justices nominated by a man why actually understands our constitution and legal system. Our standing of international leadership, squandered by the Shrub, is practically restored. Obama is surrounded by brilliant, inclusive people who understand economics, technology, and who see government as the corporation of the people instead of as a tool of the corporations. The VP-elect is a smart, tough guy who can take over if (perish the thought) necessary.

There is some bad news on the gay-rights front, but history is moving - it won't stand. This is a wonderful day, folks.

And thank you, Dana, for keeping the spotlight on during this election.

Anonymous said...

Lets not get ahead of ourselves: Prop 8 passed, Alaska re-elected a felon, Michelle Bachmann of the Anti-American rant is returning to the House. Having Obama as our next President is a damn sight better than the alternative, but this was by no means a rout of the Republicans.

Efrique said...

Yeah, Prop 8, Bachmann and Stevens certainly soured the sweet milk of hope somewhat.

Assuming Stevens loses the appeal (that's still coming, right?), what then? How is he replaced (excuse my ignorance)?

george.w said...

If Stevens loses his appeal it will be the governor's job to appoint a successor.

We will have the same distinction here in Illinois and also in Delaware. Theoretically our corrupt gov. Blagogevich could appoint himself.

Cujo359 said...

That 64 percent turnout is impressive, at least in contrast to the typical turnout. Hopefully, that will start a trend.

As anonymous mentions, there are plenty of things still to be corrected about our politics. Sixty Democratic Senators of the kind we have now would not have been a "veto proof" majority. Frankly, I find that label absurd.

Still, it's a good day. American politics are a little more open, and there will be an adult in charge for the first time in nearly a decade. That's something to be thankful for.

Efrique said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Efrique said...

I looked it up. Alaska has a law that says the governor can't appoint a successor.

(It also has a somewhat contradictory other law, but that's Alaska for you)

george.w said...

Ah, I should have thought Alaska would be different from Illinois.